REGISTRATION FOR THE TRANSPORT FESTIVAL IS NOW CLOSED

 

This year, as always, we have an outstanding array of vehicles and machinery. Leading the field in the agricultural department is a 1938 McCormack Deering Tractor from America which is thought most likely to have come to the UK on a lend-lease basis in World War II. 

To name just a few of the numerous examples in the other categories on show you will find a 1956 Series 1 Landrover with a soft top, a 1956 Austin Healey 3000 and an American Ford Mustang.  In the motorcycle section you will find an impressive spread of the best of British BSA, Triumph, Norton, Velocette and Arial, together with a selection of machines from around the world.  Finally a selection of heavy transport,

Please take a stroll around the transport festival paddock and take in the quality engineering of days long gone.

 

 

Lomax 224

Lomax 224

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During it’s restoration and renovation some parts that were designed for use on the road is now fitted with parts designed for use in the air - a fitting combination for an Airshow & Festival of Transport.  

When the present owner bought the car it had been under a tarpaulin for 7 years in Borth, Nr. Aberystwyth, totally corroded including wiring, instruments and metal components.   Difficulties in finding original Lomax instruments set him down the road of using “out-of- the-box” thinking, the result of which led to him fitting instruments and gauges originally intended for aircraft,  e.g. Turn and slip, G acceleration, oil pressure, exhaust gas temperature and others. 

These parts were originally used in impressive aircraft such as a Vulcan, Buccaneer, Jaguar  and even an ignition switch from a PBY Catalina.

 

 

1967 MGB

1967 MGB

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Stan Mountford, the present owner, bought this vehicle in October 1988 as a non-runner having been off the road for about two years.  The state it was in meant the only option was dismantling and rebuilding with a new body shell.  The next 18 months were spent bringing it back to a road worthy condition. It is now in regular use completing over 80,000 miles.  Originally the MGB was rated at 67 bhp and had a claimed top speed of 108mph (perhaps downhill with a following wind), but with an uprated engine and handling kit, this car is around 97 bhp can do rather better.

When TV’s Channel Five recorded a programme called “The Dream Machine” in which classic cars were restored and demonstrated this car was featured and driven by racing driver Amanda Stretton, around tracks at Chatsworth House in Derbyshire.  

 

 

1927 Lea Francis K Type

1927 Lea Francis K Type

posted in: 2016, Transport Festival | 0

Lea Francis were a Coventry based manufacturer, who began making bicycles in 1895, and producing their first motor car in 1903. The K Type was built from 1925 until 1928.

Over 300 K Types were built, but only 7 are thought to have survived to the present day. This particular example is unique in the following way. Around half a dozen K Types were fitted with this style of bodywork, 2 seater tourer with single dickie seat in the boat tail, built by Avon Coachbuilders. This car is the sole survivor of that run.
It has been restored a couple of times in its long life, the first time being in the 1950s, and the second occasion being in 1983. The story of the car being the subject of a feature article in the August 1984 edition of The Automobile magazine.

Whilst the engine has undergone a rebuild a few years ago, it is the original power unit.

Thanks to Ian Cheetham from Llanerfyl for kindly exhibiting his lovely car once again at this year’s show.